Zinc Additives Boost Efficiency of Perovskite Solar Minimodules

Feb 21, 2024 11:13 AM ET

  • Researchers develop mini solar modules using zinc trifluoromethane sulfonate, boosting efficiency and stability of perovskite cells for cost-effective production.

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and CubicPV have developed mini solar modules using zinc trifluoromethane sulfonate to improve the efficiency of perovskite cells. The zinc salt helps control iodide defects in the perovskite ink and films, making module fabrication more reproducible and cost-effective. By adding different zinc salts to perovskite ink and testing various concentrations, they found that Zn(OOSCF3)2 at 0.28% delivered the best results, with an average open circuit voltage of 1.18 V and a fill factor of 82%.

The fabricated mini modules with areas of 78 cm2, 84 cm2, and 108 cm2 showed power conversion efficiencies of 19.60% and 19.21% with aperture areas of 84 cm2 and 108 cm2, respectively. The researchers emphasized that Zn(OOSCF3)2 passivated the defects of the perovskites without significant changes in grain size, improving device efficiency and stability. To be used commercially, this method will need to be applied to equipment capable of handling larger modules.

In conclusion, the use of zinc additives in perovskite solar minimodules shows promise for improving efficiency and stability, with the potential for cost-effective production on a larger scale in the future.

How can zinc trifluoromethane sulfonate enhance perovskite solar module efficiency?

  • Zinc trifluoromethane sulfonate helps control iodide defects in perovskite ink and films, making module fabrication more reproducible and cost-effective.
  • Adding Zn(OOSCF3)2 at 0.28% concentration delivered the best results, with an average open circuit voltage of 1.18 V and a fill factor of 82%.
  • Mini modules with areas of 78 cm2, 84 cm2, and 108 cm2 showed power conversion efficiencies of 19.60% and 19.21% with aperture areas of 84 cm2 and 108 cm2, respectively.
  • Zn(OOSCF3)2 passivated the defects of the perovskites without significant changes in grain size, improving device efficiency and stability.
  • This method will need to be applied to equipment capable of handling larger modules for commercial use.
  • The use of zinc additives in perovskite solar minimodules shows promise for improving efficiency and stability, with the potential for cost-effective production on a larger scale in the future.

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